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An article about Jaymes Duding's "Glove Art" recently made the front page of the Albuquerque Journal.  The article includes some very nice photos and a description of an artistic sideline Jaymes has pursued for decades.

You can view the article on the newspapr's web site here: Glove Art Reflects American Spirit or download and save a PDF version of the entire article here: Jaymes Dudding Glove Art - Abq Journal 11-14-2013.


Jaymes Dudding's pottery and sculptures are on display and available for purchase at these superb art galleries:
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New Mexico Pottery & Sculpture

Jaymes Dudding grew up in Albuquerque’s north valley along the Rio Grande.   He is a ceramic sculptor and art educator.  

Artist Jaymes developed a deep appreciation for the colors and textures of this unique region of the world.  Born with the DNA of an artist, Jaymes has enjoyed the luxury of turning his love of desert colors and textures into three dimensional pieces of New Mexico pottery and New Mexico sculpture.

Jaymes knew having artistic talent wasn't enough.  He also needed training, and he got it. He earned a Master Of Arts degree from University Of New Mexico, then a Master Of Fine Arts In Ceramic Design degree from University Of Oklahoma.

Pottery, clay sculpture and ceramic art are fundamental to the culture of Native Americans in the desert southwest.   In the late 20th century, however, these unique art forms were dying out of American Indian life.  Remarkably, an Indian Reservation in northern New Mexico sought out Jaymes Dudding to help keep their culture alive.  Barely out of college himself, Jaymes moved to the tiny town of Saboyeta, New Mexico, and for about half a decade he taught Native American art to Native Americans.

He taught for 28 years at the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma.   Since his retirement, he has taught part-time at Walatowa High Charter School in Jemez Pueblo.

Jaymes begins his creations on the potter’s wheel.   He then manipulates the clay by using stretching and paddling techniques until his desired image takes life.   His subject matter is inspired by ancient, timeless ideas from Mother Nature and her unseen animating forces.

All the New Mexico pottery and New Mexico sculptures you will find in the pages of this web site are available for mail order.  Jaymes is more artist than business person, so this site is not set up with shopping carts and credit card payment systems.  Just call or drop Jaymes an e-mail and he will gladly quote pottery prices and sculpture prices, arrange your purchase and ship your items.

From The Artist

The amazing abundance of symbolic forms and images through time and across the Earth on pottery vessels, female figurines and other cult objects has persuaded me that these works are much more than simply decorative geometric motifs. I'm convinced that they belong to an un-deciphered language of the metaphysical. Among the lines and shapes on these artifacts are to be found primal insignia of the snake, bird, bison, egg, heart and womb. The water-carrier is another familiar image of the goddess and associates her with the waters of life, life-giver, and ultimately, the mysterious source of all life.

My ceramic sculptures have been inspired by these powerful forms and images. The shapes seem to have been stretched by their own contents. The large dimension of the vessels removes them from functional applications. Such pots have always been essential elements of ancient rituals and sacred ceremonies. Vessels such as these once received sacrifices and holy waters. They were created to honor and enchant the perceived energy personified by Mother Nature.

I hope the observer can sense the ages-old nonchalance I admire so much in the work of these ancient potters: Consummate skill expressed through intimate knowledge of materials. It is evident that their process was driven by an intuitive sensitivity to form and surface. Finally, I hope the energy vested in the creation of these vessels finds a resonance in the viewer's imagination.

--Jaymes Dudding



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